Quarmby lab welcomes two new researchers

I first came to the Quarmby Lab as a volunteer in the summer of 2009. I did both my BISC 498 and ISS research projects on the Chlamydomonas Katanin homologs KAT1 and KAT2. The Katanin proteins are part of the superfamily of AAA microtubule severing enzymes which are believed to sever the 9 outer doublet microtubules of the flagellar axoneme during deflagellation. Currently I am working on identifying the acid deflagellation gene ADF1. The Quarmby lab previously identified six mutant alleles of ADF1 which prevent deflagellation upon addition of a weak acid by inhibiting extracellular calcium influx,
a requirement for deflagellation. For my thesis not only will I try to identify the ADF1 gene but also begin to characterize the adf1 mutant alleles.

I am originally from Honduras a small country in Central America,
I moved to Canada with my mother and sister when I was 8 years old. My future goals are to continue in research and become a doctor. I like to watch movies, spend time with friends and cheer on the Vancouver Canucks whenever I can.
I first came to the Quarmby Lab as a volunteer in the summer of 2009. I did both my BISC 498 and ISS research projects on the Chlamydomonas Katanin homologs KAT1 and KAT2. The Katanin proteins are part of the superfamily of AAA microtubule severing enzymes which are believed to sever the 9 outer doublet microtubules of the flagellar axoneme during deflagellation. Currently I am working on identifying the acid deflagellation gene ADF1. The Quarmby lab previously identified six mutant alleles of ADF1 which prevent deflagellation upon addition of a weak acid by inhibiting extracellular calcium influx,
a requirement for deflagellation. For my thesis not only will I try to identify the ADF1 gene but also begin to characterize the adf1 mutant alleles.

I am originally from Honduras a small country in Central America,
I moved to Canada with my mother and sister when I was 8 years old. My future goals are to continue in research and become a doctor. I like to watch movies, spend time with friends and cheer on the Vancouver Canucks whenever I can.
I first came to the Quarmby Lab as a volunteer in the summer of 2009. I did both my BISC 498 and ISS research projects on the Chlamydomonas Katanin homologs KAT1 and KAT2. The Katanin proteins are part of the superfamily of AAA microtubule severing enzymes which are believed to sever the 9 outer doublet microtubules of the flagellar axoneme during deflagellation. Currently I am working on identifying the acid deflagellation gene ADF1. The Quarmby lab previously identified six mutant alleles of ADF1 which prevent deflagellation upon addition of a weak acid by inhibiting extracellular calcium influx, a requirement for deflagellation. For my thesis not only will I try to identify the ADF1 gene but also begin to characterize the adf1 mutant alleles.

I am originally from Honduras a small country in Central America, I moved to Canada with my mother and sister when I was 8 years old. My future goals are to continue in research and become a doctor. I like to watch movies, spend time with friends and cheer on the Vancouver Canucks whenever I can.

Stephanie Campbell recently completed her B.Sc. Honours thesis in the lab of Dr. Rosemary Cornell at SFU. Steph’s research project explored the autoinhibitory silencing mechanism of an enzyme called CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) that exists in both soluble and membrane-bound states. When she is not in the lab, web Stephanie enjoys being active and outdoors – running, hiking, skiing, cycling and gardening. She also enjoys travel and has her sights set on visiting the island of Santorini in Greece.

Negin Rahanjam recently received her M.Sc. from Leiden University , The Netherlands where she worked on apoptosis-related genes and autolysis in Aspergillus. Negin lives in Richmond with her husband Ali and their dog Gismo. They are anticipating the birth of their first baby in January 2012. Negin is originally from Iran and lived in The Netherlands for 6 years before moving to Vancouver.

Both Steph and Negin have joined us as part-time research assistants for the fall semester to help Laura Hilton crack the case of the mysterious CNK2.