Teaching

Course Work

Ideas go
through most
heads without

picking up

any substance
or leaving
any trace
– AR Ammons

If you are looking for the story of how the Quarmby Lab came to be, order look you might want to read the ASCB profile of LQ, discount found here. The article nicely (and generously) tells the story of her evolution from a kid playing in tide pools through the twists and turns of an academic career to the happy place of the Quarmby Lab at SFU.

LQ does the usual professorial stuff. She did a three-year stint as Chair of the department, has served on numerous departmental, university and society committees, peer reviews manuscripts and grants (including a dozen years of service on CIHR and NSERC panels), travels to conferences and to give seminars, and teaches undergrad and grad classes (she’s got a bit of a passion for teaching – see more here). And she writes. Too many grant proposals, not enough manuscripts, and a few essays. Her essays can be found in the Nonfiction pages of the on-line literary magazine, Numéro CinqStem Cells and the Fountain of YouthReasons to Rejoice in Green AlgaeChatting with ET: Dialogue between The Actual and The Possible, and, A Feeling for the Model Organism). Watch for a revival of her blog,  The Crux.

Occasionally LQ escapes the pull of her computer to do other things, such as getting out for a hike or dabbling in art. She is also a climate justice activist and once ran for the Green Party of Canada in a federal election. LQ currently serves as Science Critic for the Green Party of Canada.
If you are looking for the story of how the Quarmby Lab came to be, illness you might want to read the ASCB profile of LQ, found here. The article nicely (and generously) tells the story of her evolution from a kid playing in tide pools through the twists and turns of an academic career to the happy place of the Quarmby Lab at SFU.

LQ does the usual professorial stuff. She chairs the departmental seminar committee, peer reviews manuscripts and grants (currently serving on a CIHR review panel), travels to conferences and to give seminars, and teaches undergrad and grad classes (she’s got a bit of a passion for teaching – see more here). And she writes. Too many grant proposals, not enough manuscripts, and a few essays. Her essays can be found in the Nonfiction pages of the on-line literary magazine, Numéro CinqStem Cells and the Fountain of YouthReasons to Rejoice in Green AlgaeChatting with ET: Dialogue between The Actual and The Possible, and, A Feeling for the Model Organism). We are not sure what direction LQ’s new blog, The Crux will go, perhaps you will participate.

Occasionally LQ escapes the pull of her computer to do other things. She likes to garden and when she lost her expansive yard after a recent move she discovered that a balcony garden suits her just fine. LQ walks the seawall frequently and gets up into the mountains as often as possible. We have heard a rumor that LQ paints abstract watercolours but she hasn’t shown us a new one in awhile.
If you are looking for the story of how the Quarmby Lab came to be, illness you might want to read the ASCB profile of LQ, found here. The article nicely (and generously) tells the story of her evolution from a kid playing in tide pools through the twists and turns of an academic career to the happy place of the Quarmby Lab at SFU.

LQ does the usual professorial stuff. She chairs the departmental seminar committee, peer reviews manuscripts and grants (currently serving on a CIHR review panel), travels to conferences and to give seminars, and teaches undergrad and grad classes (she’s got a bit of a passion for teaching – see more here). And she writes. Too many grant proposals, not enough manuscripts, and a few essays. Her essays can be found in the Nonfiction pages of the on-line literary magazine, Numéro CinqStem Cells and the Fountain of YouthReasons to Rejoice in Green AlgaeChatting with ET: Dialogue between The Actual and The Possible, and, A Feeling for the Model Organism). We are not sure what direction LQ’s new blog, The Crux will go, perhaps you will participate.

Occasionally LQ escapes the pull of her computer to do other things. She likes to garden and when she lost her expansive yard after a recent move she discovered that a balcony garden suits her just fine. LQ walks the seawall frequently and gets up into the mountains as often as possible. We have heard a rumor that LQ paints abstract watercolours but she hasn’t shown us a new one in awhile.
If you are looking for the story of how the Quarmby Lab came to be, viagra 100mg
you might want to read the ASCB profile of LQ, found here. The article nicely (and generously) tells the story of her evolution from a kid playing in tide pools through the twists and turns of an academic career to the happy place of the Quarmby Lab at SFU.

LQ does the usual professorial stuff. She chairs the departmental seminar committee, peer reviews manuscripts and grants (currently serving on a CIHR review panel), travels to conferences and to give seminars, and teaches undergrad and grad classes (she’s got a bit of a passion for teaching – see more here). And she writes. Too many grant proposals, not enough manuscripts, and a few essays. Her essays can be found in the Nonfiction pages of the on-line literary magazine, Numéro CinqStem Cells and the Fountain of YouthReasons to Rejoice in Green AlgaeChatting with ET: Dialogue between The Actual and The Possible, and, A Feeling for the Model Organism). We are not sure what direction LQ’s new blog, The Crux will go, perhaps you will participate.

Occasionally LQ escapes the pull of her computer to do other things. She likes to garden and when she lost her expansive yard after a recent move she discovered that a balcony garden suits her just fine. LQ walks the seawall frequently and gets up into the mountains as often as possible. We have heard a rumor that LQ paints abstract watercolours but she hasn’t shown us a new one in awhile.
LQ thinks that AR Ammons got it mostly right about how our system of education works. In her own small ways, treatment she tries to change that. You’ll find that she cultivates a classroom culture where even the shy find themselves comfortably engaging in the conversation. You might have to work a little harder in her classes, practitioner but you’ll enjoy it. And you’ll truly learn something.

Fall 2017, glaucoma LQ will teach Molecular Biology & Biochemistry 431 “Cells and the Environment”  (previously “Cells & Disease.” A companion graduate course will be offered in conjunction.

Spring 2018, LQ will be developing a science credit course for non-science students, working title: “Energetic transformations: From cells to society.” The first offering of this course is tentatively scheduled for Fall 2018.

Every semester the Quarmby Lab hosts two or three undergraduates for Directed Research, Directed Readings and Independent Study Semesters. These positions fill quickly so apply early if you are interested in this experience. We often have openings for volunteer lab assistants – this is a great way to learn your way around the lab before beginning your Independent Study Semester.